Level 2-6: Regroup to Progress

5 Nov

Eleanor Lamb's Helmet and Harness

Now for the second half of our Saturday night Work-a-Thon and beyond! While Daniel was working away on Eleanor Lamb‘s helmet, I was busy with the harness. Even though it’s not the flashy, hardware speckled spectacle that Subject Delta’s harness was, Eleanor’s harness posed its own set of difficult intricacies.

All that I needed to do was attach a foam liner along the outer edge which might seem like a simple task until you take into account the imperfections in the proportions of the frame. Sure, building these on ourselves made for a snug, customized look, but like most bodies our are asymmetrical. In other words, we’re crooked and crooked is difficult to line in ruler straight strips of foam. The front was no problem but the back, oh boy, the back is where I ran into some hangups.

Eleanor Lamb harness and helmet 2 backThis is a decent angle for you to really see the hump on the back of the harness which, at a glance, doesn’t seem like it should be too much trouble. Until I laid a strip of foam along the edge, I didn’t think it would be too bad either. Foam Lining on Eleanor Lamb's harness

Until I discovered that I would have to “Frankenstein” the strips of foam together with little cuts and hot glue. It took about four different pieces of foam in an 8 inch section and then three strips on the other side. It was a hassle but it was satisfying!

Foam Lining on Eleanor Lamb's harness

While this may be hard to believe, in all the months that we’ve been working on this project, this was the first where we both needed the glue gun at the same time. And instead of going out to buy a second glue gun, like normal people, we decided to share it. And by share it, I mean sliding it back and forth to one between opposite ends of the wooden board we were using as a single work surface. I’m sure it was both amusing and adorable. We’ve been told we’re adorable.

The fruits of our night’s labor looked something like this:

Eleanor Lamb's helmet Crooked Harness

Notice anything askew? Aside from my looking like I have a brown mustache, that harness is incredibly crooked. At first, we wondered if this was because of the way I was standing but, sadly, the bright yellow lining made clear our mistake but we had to wait until the next day to fix it.

Bright and early the next morning, before I even brushed my teeth, I was up and working. Daniel went to go get breakfast but, before he left, I had him take a couple of reference pictures. Turns out the source of the problem was a big freaking gap between my left shoulder and the harness. Looks like I might have had some major tension in that shoulder while Daniel was building the frame.

Crooked Harness Front ViewCrooked Harness Side View

So I whipped out the old glue gun, cut some strips of 5 mm craft foam and made some foam pads. The difference was amazing!

Harness Corrected Front Harness Corrected Side View

And with that little hitch out of our way, we were just a short sprint away from completing the harness. But while I stretch in preparation for the 10 yard dash, Daniel’s going to tell you about his new favorite product.

Rubber Weather SealRubber Weatherseal!!! It’s made for doors and windows but, man, is it my new favorite material to work with. It comes in a variety of shapes, has its own built-in adhesive strip and is made of durable, flexible rubber. How can you not love it already?

I came across this little gem while perusing the aisles of Home Depot in search of something to use for the seam work on Eleanor Lamb’s helmet. We sketched out the shape of the seams using one of our black markers, cut the pieces to fit, peeled off the self-adhesive backing and laid them in place.

Easiest step we’ve had to date!

This stuff was also really easy to cut a piece together into nice, crisp corners. It also bends quite nicely to allow for smooth curves. Great stuff!!! Can’t wait to find other uses for it as we proceed with this and other cosplay projects. It’s easy to work with, yields great results and makes what would other wise be a painstaking detail process a snap. And look at those results. — Daniel

Eleanor Lamb's Helmet Back View

And we’re always thankful for an affordable product that saves us time! You can also see that we added the little port holes to the back. Just like Subject Delta’s helmet we used plastic insulating bushing rings, found from the plumbing section at Home Depot. They come in all sizes which lend a bit of consistency as we moved from size to size between the two of our helmets.

Next, we applied a second layer of the 2 mm craft foam to the edges of the harness, a bit of that magic weatherseal, a couple of those wire rope clips, seven wing nuts and the harness was all set! This was a very quick step since most of these materials and processes were used on Subject Delta’s helmet.

Eleanor Lamb's Harness front view

The next to last step concerns the little panels you see running along the top of Eleanor Lamb’s helmet between the main porthole and the “little hat,” as we’ve taken to calling it. We decided to make these out of 2 mm craft foam strips that would be glued to the helmet and tucked beneath the flex tubing that runs between the porthole and the little hat.

helmet ridge stripsDaniel cut, positioned and then trimmed with the X-acto knife each individual strip. He then glued them into place being careful of the spacing not only between each strip but between the two rows as well.

Ridges on Helmet FinishedWith most of the details now in place, I cut a couple of rings out of 5 mm craft foam, Daniel slapped some wood glue between the layers and voila – we’ve got ourselves a bonafide Eleanor Lamb helmet!

We attempted several selfies so that you guys could get an epically awesome picture of the two for us in our helmets but none of them met our high standard of Bioshocking awesomeness. So we’ll get that together for you all to enjoy in the next post.

Until then, any Chicago readers picked up their C2E2 tickets yet? The count down on their site makes this very, very real. Whoa!! — TGC

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One Response to “Level 2-6: Regroup to Progress”

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Level 3-1: Acquire and Assemble Weapon | Co-Op Campaign - November 12, 2013

    […] yarn and wrapped it around the cone so that we could trace it. Then we applied Daniel’s new favorite material; rubber weatherseal. It wrapped smoothly and seamlessly around the cone and the adhesive […]

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